Update: 2018-05-06 08:05 PM -0400

TIL

Family Law and Customary Law in Asia:

A Contemporary Legal Perspective,

Buxbaum-indx.htm

by David C. Buxbaum, Assoc. of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning, Springer Netherlands, Jan 1, 1967, pp288.

Downloaded and edited, by U Kyaw Tun (UKT) (M.S., I.P.S.T., USA) and staff of Tun Institute of Learning (TIL) . Not for sale. No copyright. Free for everyone. Prepared for students and staff of TIL Research Station, Yangon, MYANMAR:  http://www.tuninst.net , www.romabama.blogspot.com

UKT 180503: Thanks to Emperor Asoka (Buddhist converted from Jain - never a Hindu, nor Islam), the geographical area, had used the Asokan Brahmi script. The inhabitants had probably spoken Tib-Bur and Sino-Tibetan speeches. They did not spoke IE, and probably not Aus-Asi.

Their implements of war were made of Bronze - the alloy of copper and tin. They were relative peaceful like the Pyus of prehistoric Myanmarpré. Because of the similar weather conditions, the flora and fauna had been very similar. I expect them to be worshippers of Mother Goddesses, and had held their mothers in high respect.

They were mostly farmers and fishermen - very much unlike the IE speakers holding Iron implements of war, and much used to travelling through deserts and oceans guided by celestial navigation - looking to the stars. I have come into this subject while working through A Practical Sanskrit Dictionary - by A A Macdonell:
Refer to - Section 7 > MC-indx.htm > p085R.htm : Rahan

index.htm | Top
Buxbaum-indx.htm

 

Contents of this page

UKT 180423, 180501: My interest is in Myanmarpre Burma, where the majority in northern part speak Bur-Myan, and in the southern part, at one time spoke Mon-Myan and at the present speak Bur-Myan. What I got from the Internet were book previews which have been pieced together into a comprehensive piece. Please remember the whole work is under a copy right, and this TIL edition is only for non-profit study. The first preview that I came across was p071. Working backwards, I got the TOC on page roman12. My interest is on:
¤ Anglo-Indian Legislation and Burmese Customary Law , approx p071.
¤ Customary Law and the Formal Legal Institutions, p072 ... , p086 

UKT notes :
Culture and Languages of Myanmarpré : how I first got involved

• Introduction by David C. Buxbaum - intro.htm
• On Burma - onburma.htm
• Read a related paper in TIL HD-PDF and SD-PDF library, titled Rediscovering "Law" in Myanmar: a review of scholarship on the Legal System of Myanmar , by M. Crouch, 2014
- MCrouch-RediscoveryLawMyanmar<Ô> / Bkp<Ô> (link chk 180506)
"Myanmar’s legal system is an understudied area in the academic field of Asian Legal Studies. This article aims to provide a map of legal scholarship in Myanmar that can be built on in the future. ..."

 

Search string: Customary law and the formal legal institutions - Buxbaum
From: http://www.gde.mj.pt/bpgr/bpgr.nsf/305fde3cddf188ab802569660044179b/b92a3d3ad810caaa8025814d0051594e?OpenDocument 180506
UKT comment - only TOC: not worth digitizing.

 

Search string: Customary law and the formal legal institutions - Burma - Buxbaum
https://books.google.com.mm/books?id=ouPuCAAAQBAJ&pg=PA70&lpg=PA70&dq=Customary+law+and+the+formal+legal+institutions+-+Burma+-+Buxbaum&source=bl&ots=1u9Qt0arO8&sig=dGAoBprhedRXHlKdimB1lu34y4Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjP48LL4PHaAhXHQY8KHaZDC90Q6AEILDAC#v=onepage&q=Customary%20law%20and%20the%20formal%20legal%20institutions%20-%20Burma%20-%20Buxbaum&f=false 180506
UKT comment - false info: p069 - p093 could not be loaded by the website

 

From: https://books.google.com.mm/books?id=ouPuCAAAQBAJ&pg=PA206&lpg=PA206&dq=A+Contemporary+Legal+Perspective+-+David+C.+Buxbaum+-+book+preview&source=bl&ots=1u9Qo4bnIg&sig=RGBwQ2PaPWdacF5yliSAO8OIWcY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiMv8__sOTaAhVFYo8KHQVTA9E4ChDoAQgvMAI#v=onepage&q=A%20Contemporary%20Legal%20Perspective%20-%20David%20C.%20Buxbaum%20-%20book%20preview&f=false 180501

UKT 180502: A similar TOC is found in: Folk Elements in Buddhism, by Maung (Dr.) Htin Aung which has been changed to TIL format as given below:

(p.roman11?)

Preface - vii
Conference participants - vii
INTRODUCTION (David C. Buxbaux ) - ix

Contents of this page

PART 1.  THE NATURE OF CUSTOMARY LAW IN DIVERSE ASIAN SOCIETIES - 001

 

Chapter 01.  Customary Law and Modernization in Indonesia (S Takdir Alisjabbana) - 003

Contents of this page

Chapter 02.  The Nature of Malay Customary Law (Joseph Minattur) - 017

02.1.  Introduction - 017
02.2.  Adat Melayu (Malay Custom) - 018
02.3.  Basic Laws - 020
02.4.  Adat Law and Custom - 021
02.5.  Constitutional Structure - 023
02.6.  Land Tenure - 026
02.7.  Husband's Position - 029
02.8.  Administration of the Adat - 032
02.9.  Conclusion - 037

Contents of this page

Chapter 03.  Some Iban (Sea Dayak) Customary Law in Sarawak (Benedict Sandin) - 040

See my note on the Culture and Languages of Myanmarpré

03.1. Customs regarding Engagement, Marriage, and Widowhood - 041
03.1.1.  Nanya Bini (Engagement) - 041
03.1.2.  Melah Pinang (Marriage Feast) - 041
03.1.3.  Sarak Belega (Temporary Divorce) - 041
03.1.4.  Sarak Rama (Ordinary Divorce) - 042
03.1.5.  Sarak Manis (Mutual Divorce) - 042
03.1.6.  Bedua Reta (Division of Property) - 042
03.1.7.  Bedua Anak (Division of Children) - 042
03.1.8.  Balu (Widowhood) - 042
03.1.9.  Berangkat Tulang (Uprooting the deceased's bones) - 043

03.2.  Negmulu Antu (Disrespect of the decreased husband) - 043
03.2.1.  Butang Antu (Disrespect of the dead by adultery) - 043
03.2.2.  Bebini Maioh (Polygamy) - 043

03.3.  Codification of Customary Law - 043

Contents of this page

Chapter 04.  Some notes on Chinese Customary Marriage (Vermier Yanatak Chiu) - 045

04.1.1.  The Six Rites - 045

From: https://books.google.com.mm/books?id=_G7DDImClpoC&printsec=frontcover&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=true 180501
UKT 180503: The link is active.

(p.roman12)
Table of Contents

04.1.2 The Master of Matrimony and the Go-between - 045
04.1.3  Position of Women in Old China - 046
04.1.4  Concubinage - Secondary Wives - 047
04.1.5  Ju Kung - 048
04.1.6  Fu Cheng - 048
04.1.7  Chein T'iao - 048
04.1.8  T'ung Yang Hsi - 048
04.1.9 Some Customary Restrictions on Marriages - 049

Chapter 05. Some notes on Indian influence on Malay 05.1.1 Customary Law (Joseph Minattur) - 050

Contents of this page

PART 2. CUSTOMARY LAW AND THE FORMAL LEGAL INSTITUTIONS: INTERACTION AND CONFLICT - 065

Chapter 06.  The effect of Anglo-Indian Legislation on Myanmar Burmese Customary Law (U Hla Aung) - 067
[Since it is also applicable to Mons of Lower Myanmarpré, I've struck out the term Burmese and have inserted Myanmar - the inhabitants of Myanmarpré.]

06.1.  Introduction - 067
06.1.1.  The Coming of British Rule - 067
06.1.2.  Introduction of English Law - 068
06.1.3.  The Court System Under British Rule - 069
06.1.4.  Imposition of "Direct Rule" - 070

06.2.  Codes vs Custom - 071
06.2.1.  Indian Codes for the Burmese - 071
06.2.2.  Criminal Law and Procedure - 075
06.2.3.  Civil Law and Procedure - 078

06.3.  Judicial Legislation: Court vs Custom - 080
06.3.1.  Saving of Personal Laws - 080
06.3.2.  Ignorance of the Nature of Burmese Law - 081
06.3.3.  Private Interest and Social Welfare - 084
06.3.4.  'Justice, Equity and Good Conscience' - 086

06.4.  Conclusion - 087

Chapter 07. Some main Features of Modernization of Ancient Family Law in Thailand
  (Adul Wichiencharoen and Luang Chamroom Netisastra) - 089

07.1.  The  Ancient Law - 089
07.1.1.  Polygamy - 091
07.1.1.  Conjugal Power of the Husband - 091
07.1.2.  Argument for Modernization - 092

07.2.  The Modern Law - 098.
07.2.1.  Marriage - 098
07.2.2.  Status of the Spouses and Matrimonial Property - 101
07.2.3.  Divorce - 103

07.3.  Muslim Law - 105
 UKT 180503: The British Raj had colonialized the Muslim Malay Peninsular in the 19th century. Buddhist Thailand had owned an island close to the Malay Peninsular. The British diplomats coaxed Thailand to exchange their island with Buddhist population for the northern-most part with Muslim population.

07.4.  Conclusion - 105

(p.roman12end-p.roman13begin)

 

 

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 08.  Islam and Customary Law in the Malaysian
Legal Contest (Inche Ahmad bin Mohamed Ibrahim) - 107

08.1.  Historical Introduction  - 107

08.2.  Federal Constitution - 108

08.3.  Malay Custom and Muslim Law
  in the Malaysian Legal Context - 112.
08.3.1.  Marriage - 112
08.3.2.  Divorce - 119
08.3.3.  Adoption - 127
08.3.4.  Property and Inheritance - 130
08.3.5.  Death, 142.

08.4.  Conclusion  - 144.

 

Chapter 09. Chinese Family Law in a common Law Setting. A note on the Institutional Environment and the substantive Family Law of the Chinese in Singapore and Malaysia (Divid C, Buxtaum) - 146

09.1.  Introduction - 146

09.2. The Institutional Environment - 148
09.2.1. Relevant Legal Institutions
  in Traditional China - 148.
09.2.2. Institutions of Legal Significance
  in the Early Colonial Period
  in Malaysia and Singapore - 151
09.2.3. Transition from the Capitan China System
  to Formal British Rule in Singapore and Malaysia
  and the Institutionalization of the Court System - 154

09.3.  The Substantive Law - 157
09.3.1.  The Status of Secondary Wives, T'sips,  - 159. - 09.3.2.  Adoption, 166

09.4.  Conclusion - 173.

Contents of this page

 

PART 3. CUSTOMARY LAW AND THE FAMILY IN  MODERNIZING SOCIETY - 179.

Chapter 10.  Malay Customary Law and the Family (Haji Mohamed Din bin Ali) - 181

10.1.1  Basic  Family Customary Rule - 182.
10.1.2  Relationship of Parent- Child - 184.
10.1.3  The Family is a Member of a Tribe - 185.
10.1.4  Land Tenure - 186.
10.1.5  Marriage Properties - 187.
10.1.6  The Role of the Woman - 189.
10.1.7  The Preference for Daughters - 190.
10.1.8  The Modifying Influence of Islam - 192.
10.1.9  The Marriage System - 193.
10.2.0  The Death of Either Spouse - 194.
10.2.1  The Customary Tribal Obligations - 195 (p.roman13end-p.roman14)
10.2.2.  The Prohibition of Marriage Relationship - 199.
10.2.3.  Succession of Property - 200.

Contents of this page

Chapter 11. Codification of Hindu Law (S. P.Khetarpal) - 202.
11.1.1  General - 202.
11.1.2  Historical Development of Hindu Law - 203.
11.1.3  Influence of Hindu Law in South-East Asia - 205.
11.1.4  Distiction Between Hindu Religion and Hindu Law - 207.
11.1.5  Hindu Law During the British Rule - 208.
11.1.6  HIndu Law as Applied by Courts - 210.
11.1.7  Marriage - 210
11.1.8  Divorce -  212
11.1.9  Joint Family - 213
11.2.0  Woman's Right of Inheritance, 216.
11.2.1 History of Codification - 217.
11.2.2  Changes Made in Hindu Law - 222.
11.2.3  Marriage - 222
11.2.4  Viod and Viodable Marriages - 224
11.2.5  Restitution of Conjugal Rights - 224
11.2.6  Grounds for Judicial Separation - 225
11.2.7  Dissolution of Marriage - 226
11.2.8  Maintenance, Alimony, etc. - 227
11.2.9  General and Suggestions - 228
11.3.0.- The Hindu Succession Act (No. 30 of 1956)m 230.
The Validity of the Act - 231.
Hindu Law Oustide India - 232
Conclusion - 233
Chapter XII. Customary Law in Village India (K. Ishwaran) - 234.
Chapter XIII. The Widow's Statute in Vietamese Customary Law (Nguyen Xuan Chanh) - 252.
Chatper XIV. Customary Law in Pakistan ( Hassanally A. Raham) -262.
The Local Customary Law in the Punjab - 262.
Recording and Proof of Custom, 264.
The Role of Custom in Islamic Law - 265
Customary Law v. Personal Law. - 267
Table of Statutes - 269.
Table of Cases- 273.
Index - 277.

 

 

 

Contents of this page

UKT 180506: The following is an out of place TOC discovered on the Internet

From: https://books.google.com.mm/books?id=ouPuCAAAQBAJ&pg=PR11&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f=false 180501

Contents
THE NATURE OF MALAY CUSTOMARY LAW Joseph , 17
SOME IBAN SEA DAYAK CUSTOMARY LAW IN SARAWAK,  40
SOME NOTES ON INDIAN INFLUENCE ON MALAY CUSTOM, 50
THE EFFECT OF ANGLOINDIAN LEGISLATION, 66
SOME MAIN FEATURES OF MODERNIZATION OF ANCIENT,
89
Divorce 119 Adoption 127 Property and Inherit, 142
Relevant Legal Institutions in Traditional China 148 Institutions,
151
The Substantive Law, 157
Conclusion,  173

MODERNIZING SOCIETY, 179

CHAPTER x1 CODIFICATION OF HINDU LAW S P Khetarpal - 202
CUSTOMARY LAW IN VILLAGE INDIA R Ishwaran - 234

THE WIDOWS STATUTE IN VIETNAMESE CUSTOMARY - 252

CUSTOMARY LAW IN PAKISTAN Hassanally A Rah - 262

Table of Statutes, 269
Index, 277

The Status of Secondary Wives Tsips, 159
Adoption,
166

 

 

 

 

 

Contents of this page

 

UKT 180501: I am interested in Burma, and I've to piece together what I get from book previews. I first came across p071. The following is reassembled p071 and p072

Search string: Customary law and the formal legal institutions - Buxbaum
Bux071
Bux072
  UKT 180501: Being a preview, I couldn't get p073 to p085.
Bux086
Bux087

 

 

Contents of this page

UKT notes

 

Culture and Languages of Myanmarpré

UKT 180503: Frustrated with the political situation in Myanmarpré 1967 when I was transferred from RIT (Rangoon Institute of Technology where I was engaged not only teaching, but in research work on Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, to Mandalay Arts and Science University which was a non-engineering school), it came to my mind that as a national duty, a material scientist like me, should also look into the Culture and Languages of Myanmarpré to find out who we really are, and publish my findings for those who were shaping the political future of the country.

As a research project, I started with  the Indigenous Folk Lore (in Bur-Myan), by Ludu U Hla (ULay Hla to me). During that time, I had come across an article in which it was stated that the Sea Dayaks of Borneo, are related to the Karens of  Myanmarpré. We, the Bur-Myan speakers, know something about the two major dialects of the Karen-Myanmar: S'gaw-Myan and Poh-Myan, but nothing of the Sea Dayaks. Watch interesting videos on the Sea Dyaks in Karen-Dyak Section of the TIL HD-VIDEO and SD-VIDEO libraries:
- BorneoStoryDayaks<Ô> / Bkp<Ô> (link chk 180506)
- HiddenCitiesSarawak<Ô> / Bkp<Ô> (link chk 180506)
You should read, keeping in mind that Wikipedia articles can be Western-biased, and politicised :
  ¤ Mergui Archipelago - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mergui_Archipelago 180505
  ¤ Moken - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moken 180505
also watch the Salones Myanmar Mergui archipelago.
 ¤ SaloneBurma<Ô> / Bkp<Ô> (link chk 180506)

The method I used for studying the Folk Lore was to count the frequency of words relating to water, sea and sea travel, and the products of the sea and fresh water streams. Comparing such words in the stories of Karens (spread through out Myanmarpré), to the stories of Rakhines (who lived on the western sea coast), to the stories of Chins (who are mountain dwellers) showed that the frequency of Karen of words far exceeds those of Rakhines. The frequency is the lowest, as expected, in Chin. Why?

Go back Culture and Languages of Myanmarpré-note-b

 

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