Update: 2016-01-16 06:29 PM -0500

TIL

Computer Assisted Teaching of English
- Canada

Classics Canada Book 1
Authentic Readings for ESL Students

Clas5.htm
Chapters 10, 11, 12

by Patricia Brock (Dawson College) and Brian John Bushy, Prentice Hall Regents Canada, Scarborough, Ontario: copyright 1995. ISBN 0-13-328972-9

by U Kyaw Tun (UKT) (M.S., I.P.S.T., USA) and staff of Tun Institute of Learning (TIL) . Not for sale. No copyright. Free for everyone. Prepared for students and staff of TIL Research Station, Yangon, MYANMAR :  http://www.tuninst.net , www.romabama.blogspot.com

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CATE-Canada-indx.htm

Contents of this page

10. Roses Sing on New Snow
-- A Chinese-Canadian story by Paul Yee -084
  Text   Glossary  Activities

11. The Poor Cottage
-- A French-Canadian story
  by Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspe: translated by Jane Brierly - 093 (p.rom005)
  Text  Glossary  Activities

12. Water Poetry
-- Hector de St-Oenys Gameau, F. R. Scott and Raymond Souster -102
  Text  Glossary  Activities

 

UKT notes
Paul Yee - the Chinese-Canadian writer

 

Contents of this page

10. Roses Sing on New Snow
-- A Delicious Tale: A Chinese-Canadian story by Paul Yee

UKT 141125: See my note on Paul Yee

(p083begin

WARM-UP

This is a story about a young Chinese Canadian woman named Maylin. She works in a restaurant in Chinatown. She is a wonderful cook. She might make a Chinese dish like this one.

Brainstorming
Brainstorming means that each and every person is able to contribute an idea to a topic of conversation. For example, each student in the class who has a response to (p083end-p084begin) any of the following questions should offer it to the whole class. Then discuss the responses together.

Have you ever worked or have you ever known anyone who worked in a restaurant? Tell the class about it. What was the job like? What was the schedule like? What was the salary like? What was the best part of the job? What was the worst part of the job? What is your opinion of working in a restaurant?

Have you ever eaten or have you ever known anyone who has eaten in a Chinese restaurant? Tell the class about it. What was it like? What was the food like? What are the names of some Chinese dishes ? What is your opinion of Chinese food ?

Introduction to the Story
Think about these questions as you read the story: What was Maylin's job in the Chinese restaurant? When did she work? How much did she get paid? What is "Roses Sing on New Snow"? You will discover the answers to these questions as you read the story.

 

Contents of this page

Roses Sing on New Snow

Seven days a week, every week of the year, Maylin cooked in her father's restaurant. It was a spot well known throughout the New World° for its fine food.

But when compliments and tips were sent to the chef, they never reached Maylin because her father kept the kitchen door closed and told everyone that it was his two sons who did all the cooking.

Maylin's father and brothers were fat and lazy from overeating, for they loved food.

Maylin loved food too, but for different reasons. To Chinatown came men lonely and cold and bone-tired°. Their families and wives waited in China.

But a well-cooked meal would always make them smile. So Maylin worked to renew their spirits and used only the best ingredients in her cooking.

Then one day it was announced that the governor of South China was coming to town. For a special banquet°, each restaurant in Chinatown was invited to bring its best dish.

Maylin's father ordered her to spare no expense° and to use all her imagination on a new dish. She shopped in the market for fresh fish and knelt in her garden for herbs and greens°. (p084end-p085begin)

In no time. she had fashioned a dish of delectable° flavors and aromas, which she named Roses Sing on New Snow.

Maylin's father sniffed happily and went off to the banquet, dressed in his best clothes and followed by his two sons.

Now the governor also loved to eat. His eyes lit up like lanterns at the array° of platters that arrived. Every kind of meat, every color of vegetable, every bouquet of spices was present. His chopsticks° dipped eagerly into every dish.

When he was done, he pointed to Maylin's bowl and said, "That one wins my warmest praise! It reminded me of China, and yet it transported me far beyond. Tell me, who cooked it?"

Maylin's father waddled° forward and repeated the lie he had told so often before.

"Your Highness, it was my two sons who prepared it."

"Is that so?"

The governor stroked his beard thoughtfully.

"Then show my cook how the dish is done. I will present it to my emperor in China and reward you well!"

Maylin's fother and brothers rushed home. They burst into the kitchen and forced Maylin to list all her ingredients. Then they made her demonstrate how she had chopped the fish and carved the vegetables and blended the spices.

They piled everything into huge baskets and then hurried back.

A stove was set up before the governor and his cook. Maylin's brothers cut the fish and cleaned the vegetables and ground the spices. They stoked a fire and cooked the food. But with one taste, the governor threw down his chop-sticks.

"You imposters°! Do you take me for a fool?"

he bellowed.

"That is not Roses Sing on New Snow!"

Maylin's father tiptoed up and peeked.

"Why...why, there is one spice not here,"

he stuttered°.

"Name it and I will send for it!"

roared the impatient governor.

But Maylin's father had no reply, for he knew nothing about spices.

Maylin's older brother took a quick taste and said,

"Why, there's one vegetable missing!"

"Name it, and my men will fetch° it!"
ordered the governor.

But no reply came, for Maylin's older brother knew nothing about food.

Maylin's other brother blamed the fishmonger°.

"He gave us the wrong kind of fish!" he cried.

"Then name the right one, and my men will fetch it!"

said the governor.

Again there was no answer.

Maylin's father and brothers quaked with fear and fell to their knees. When the governor pounded his fist on the chair, the truth quickly spilled out. The guests were astounded° to hear that a woman had cooked this dish. Maylin's (p085end-p086begin) father hung his head in shame° as the governor sent for the real cook.

Maylin strode in and faced the governor and his men.

"Your Excellency, you cannot take this dish to China!"

she announced.

"What?"

cried the governor.

"You dare refuse the emperor a chance to taste this wonderful creation?"

"This is a dish of the New World,"

Maylin said.

"You cannot recreate it in the Old."

But the governor ignored her words and scowled.

"I can make your father's life miserable here,"

he threatened her.

So she said,

"Let you and I cook side by side°, so you can see for yourself."

The guests gasped° at her daring request. However, the governor nodded, rolled up his sleeves, and donned° an apron. Together, Maylin and the governor cut and chopped. Side by side they heated two woks°, and then stirred in identical ingredients.

When the two dishes were finally finished, the governor took a taste from both. His face paled, for they were different.

"What is your secret?"

he demanded.

"We selected the same ingredients and cooked side by side!"

"If you and I sat down with paper and brush and black ink, could we bring forth identical paintings?"

asked Maylin.

From that day on Maylin was renowned in Chinatown as a great cook and a wise person. Her fame even reached as far as China.

But the emperor, despite the governor's best efforts, was never able to taste that most delicious New World dish, nor to hear Roses Sing on New Snow.

Contents of this page

GLOSSARY

* New World (n)
 -- North, Central, or South America; the Western Hemisphere
* bone-tired (adj)
 -- extremely tired or in great need of rest and sleep
* banquet (n)
 -- a formal dinner for many people in honour of a special person
 or occasion, especially one at which speeches are made
* spare no expense (exp)
 -- spend a lot of money
* greens (n)
 -- green leafy vegetables that are cooked and eaten
* in no time (exp)
 -- very quickly
* delectable (adj)
 -- very pleasing; delightful
* array (n)
 -- a fine show, collection, or ordered group (p086end-p087begin)
* chopsticks (n)
  -- a pair of narrow sticks held between the thumb and fingers
  and used in East Asian countries when eating food
* waddled (v)
 -- walked with short steps, moving one's body from one side to the other, like a duck
* imposters (n)
 -- people who deceive by pretending to be other people
* stuttered ( v)
 -- spoke with difficulty in producing sounds, especially the first sound of a word
* fetch (v)
 -- go and get and bring back
* fishmonger (n)
 -- someone who works in a shop that sells fish
* astounded (adj)
 -- very much surprised
* in shame (exp)
 -- with the painful feeling of one's own guilt, wrongness, or failure; in disgrace; in dishonour ~
* scowled (v)
 -- made an angry, threatening expression of the face
* side by side (exp)
 -- next to one another
* gasped (v)
 -- caught the breath suddenly, especially because of surprise or shock
* donned (v)
 -- put on (clothes)
* woks (n)
 -- bowls used in East Asian countries for cooking food over heat

There may be other words and expressions in the story that are not familiar to you. Write each one in your journal. Then look it up in a dictionary, ask another student, or ask the teacher for a definition. Write the definition on the line beside the word or expression. Try to use the new word or expression in a sentence.

Contents of this page

ACTIVITIES

READING ACTIVITY

Correct the Information
This is a summary of the story, but there are some mistakes in it. Write the mistaken words in your journal and beside them write correct ones. Discuss the answers with the teacher and other students. (p087end-p088begin)

Summary
This is a short story about an old woman named Maylin. She worked in her father's flower store. Her father would tell his customers that his three daughters did all the work. The customers made a dish called Roses Sing on New Snow. The dish was given to the emperor of South China. He asked who painted it. He was told that Maylin's two sisters did the work. The emperor wanted to know how to make the dish. Maylin's brothers tried to make Roses Sing on New Snow, but it didn't smell the same. The emperor became angry. Maylin's uncle told the governor that Maylin made the dish. Maylin showed the governor how to make Roses Sing on New Snow, but he wasn't able to make it look the same. Only Maylin was able to paint Roses Sing on New Snow.

 

LISTENING ACTIVITY

Paul Yee
This is a text about the life of Paul Yee. First, listen to the text. Second, listen to the text and write as much of it as you can in your journal. Third, listen to the text and complete it. Then go over it with the teacher and other students.

 

DISCUSSION AND WRITING ACTIVITIES

Maylin's Recipe for Roses Sing on Nevv snow
Maylin made a delectable dish called Roses Sing on New Snow. She used these ingredients: (1) fish, (2) greens or vegetables, and (3) herbs and spices. Unfortunately, we don't know what kind of fish or greens or herbs and spices she used. And we don't know how she cooked the ingredients or how she arranged them on a plate.

Talk or write about the recipe for Roses Sing on New Snow. First, state the exact ingredients. Second, specify the exact quantity of the ingredients. Third, give the directions for making the dish. Share your recipe with the teacher and other students. (p088end-p089begin)

Your Favourite Recipe
Talk or write about your own favourite recipe. First, state the exact ingredients. Second, specify the exact quantity of the ingredients. Third, give the directions for making the dish. Share your recipe with the teacher and other students.

Words of Wisdom
Maylin made these two statements in the story:
 1. "Your Excellency, you cannot take this dish to China!" she announced.
      "This is a dish of the New World. You cannot recreate it in the Old."
 2. "If you and I sat down with paper and brush and black ink,
      could we bring forth identical paintings?" asked Maylin.

Do you agree or disagree with Maylin? Talk or write about one or both of these statements with the teacher and other students. Use your own knowledge and experience to support your opinions.

All Work and No Play
There is an English expression that says, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy." What do you think this expression means? Maylin worked seven days a week, every week of the year. She did not have a day off; nor did she have a vacation. What is your opinion of her work schedule? Talk or write about the arguments that you would use to make her work schedule more humane.

Daddy Dearest
Maylin did the cooking in her father's restaurant, but he did not give her the compliments or the tips that the customers sent to her. Her father and her two brothers were fat and lazy from eating too much. Her father lied to everyone and said that her two brothers did the cooking. Her father had to hang his head in shame when the governor forced him to tell the truth.

Talk or write about the way Maylin's father treats his daughter and the way he treats his sons. Do fathers usually treat their sons and daughters differently? Do mothers treat their sons and daughters differently, too? Do you think that families from different cultures treat sons and daughters differently? Do you think that they continue to do so today? How do you think boys and girls in the same family should be treated? Use your own knowledge and experience to support your opinions. Share them with the teacher and other students. (p089end-p090begin)

Restaurant Reviews
People came to eat in Maylin's father's restaurant because of the fine food. It renewed their spirits and made them smile.

Talk or write about the reasons why people go to restaurants. Mention the food, the prices, the service, the decor, the location, the opening and closing hours, the methods of payment, and special features such as access for wheelchairs, no smoking areas, music and dancing, and so on. Which features do you think are the most important? Why?

Name several restaurants in your area. Choose one of them and describe it in detail. Be sure to include your personal opinion of the restaurant, too, if you have eaten there. Share your review with the teacher and other students.

 

LIBRARY BOOKS

If you would like to read other works by Paul Yee, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

Roses Sing on New Snow
(Vancouver: Douglas & Mclntyre, 1991). This edition features illustrations by Harvey Chan.

Curses of the Third Uncle
(Toronto: Lorimer, 1986). A young adult novel about a 14-year-old girl's fight to prevent her uncle from sending her family back to China. The action takes place in Vancouver's Chinatown in 1909.

Saltwater City
(Vancouver: Douglas & Mclntyre, 1988). An illustrated history of the Chinese in Vancouver.

Tales of the Gold Mountain
(Vancouver: Douglas & Mclntyre, 1989). Eight original stories of the Chinese in Canada. Written for young adults, with illustrations by Simon Ng.

Teach Me to Fly, Skyfighter! and Other Stories
(Toronto: Lorimer, 1983). A young adult's book featuring four stories of contemporary life in Vancouver's Chinatown and Strathcona district. Illustrated by Sky Lee. (p090end-p091begin)

If you would like to read more about Chinese Canadians, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

In a Strange Land
Richard T. Wright (Saskatoon: Western Producer Prairie, 1988). A pictorial record of the first Chinese people in Canada, covering the years 1778 to 1823.

Many Mouthed Birds
Bennett Lee and Jim Wong-Chu, editors (Vancouver: Douglas & Mclntyre, 1991). A collection of contemporary writing by Chinese Canadians, including a poem by Paul Yee.

A Taste of Chinatown
Joie Warner (Toronto: Little, Brown, 1989). A collection of Chinese recipes, with photographs by Drew Warner.(p091end)

 

Contents of this page

11. The Poor Cottage
-- A French-Canadian story by Philippe-Joseph Aubert  de Gaspé: translated by Jane Brierly

(p092begin)

WARM-UP

Look at the picture carefully. This is Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspé. He wrote "The Poor Cottage" in 1863, but it is about people who lived in Normandy in France before then. It is one tale in his book Yellow-Wolf and other Tales of the Saint Lawrence.

Scanning for Specific Information
Sometimes we scan a piece of writing to find a few facts. We don't read everything. We don't even need to get a general idea about the piece of writing. We need only the specific pieces of information. We do this by reading very quickly. (p092end-p093begin)

In this activity, you will try to answer the following questions below by scanning the summary of the story below. Try to answer each question in ten seconds or less.
 01. What does the family have for supper?
 02. Where do they live?
 03. How do they feel?
 04. Who do they ask for help?
 05. Who knocks on the door?
 06. What does she want?
 07. Who has a lot of food?
 08. Who gave the old woman food and shelter?
 09. What happens to the rich man ?
 10. What happens to the poor family?

Summary
This is a story about a very poor family. They do not have enough food to eat. In fact, they have only a quarter of a loaf of bread for supper, and the parents give some to their four younger children. The parents and their two older children sit by a small fire in their hut or small house. They are very cold and hungry and they pray to God to help them.

UKT 141125: This is a story written for Christians by a Christian writer. The Christian religion is based on the Axiom that there is a Creator-God. The majority of Bur-Myan speakers in Myanmarpré are Theravada Buddhists. Buddhism is a non-Axiomatic religion which would not accept any Axiom. It does not deny the existence of Creator-God. It only treats the "Creator-god" as an axiom - something not to prove or disprove. Since modern Science is not based on any Axiom, Buddhist may be classified as a Science. Its founder Prince Siddhartha who became a Rishi had based his philosophy on natural laws such as "that every sentient being has to undergo Mental Suffering" could be very called a Scientist in the modern sense. After he had discovered this law and three more, he was called Gautama Buddha.

When Burmese Buddhists feel like praying they do pray to Gautama Buddha as a deified human being, and other axiomatic beings such as the Déva-gods.

Suddenly an old woman knocks on the door. She is also very cold and hungry and asks the family to give her something to eat. They only have a little bit of bread, but they give it to her. She asks them for more, and the father says that he will go to his rich neighbour's house and ask for some. The old woman says that she has already gone there, and that the rich man refused to give her either food or shelter.

A terrible thunder and lightning storm begins. The old woman tells the family that God is angry at the rich man and will punish him, but that God will reward the poor family. They will always have bread in the bread box or hutch from now on.

Introduction to the Story
Tales such as these were told a long time ago so they contain words and expressions that were used a long time ago. This does not mean that you cannot read and enjoy (p093end-p094begin) these stories today. You simply have to pay special attention to those words and expressions.

Here are some words in "The Poor Cottage" that are rarely heard today: *

* wuthering (v)
 -- blowing
* fagot (n)
 -- a bunch of small sticks for burning
* hark (v)
 -- listen
* behest (n)
  -- request
* passeth (v)
 -- the verb "passes"
* nabob (n)
 -- a very rich man
* beldam (n)
 -- from the French, belle dame, or gentle lady

Do you know any other words or expressions like these in English or in another language? What are they? What do they mean? Make a list of them and discuss them with the teacher and other students.

 

Contents of this page

The Poor Cottage

There was once a family of poor peasants° consisting of father, mother, and six young children. They lived in a little thatched° cottage on the edge of a Normandy forest. Let us enter this miserable hut. It was eight o'clock in the evening on a dark November night. The wind had been wuthering and the rain falling in torrents for a week, as though the waterfalls of heaven had opened and were threatening Earth with a second Flood°. The parents and two of the children, aged ten and twelve, watched by the hearth° where a dwindling fagot burned, despite wind and water swirling down the chimney. Occasional puffs of smoke left the watchers in total darkness. The four youngest children lay sleeping on piles of filthy rags and straw°.

"What misery and heartache poor people have to bear before they die," said the woodcutter. sadly. "It makes me lose heart!"

"You've never talked like this before, my man," said the woman. "Have you lost faith in God and Our Lady° -- and you such a good Christian?"

"No indeed," replied the husband. "Without that faith to sustain me, without my love for my family, I'd have died of heartbreak long ago. I've never complained about my suffering before God or man. It's your misery, dear wife and children, that tears at my heart. This evening there was only a quarter of (p094end-p095begin) a loaf of bread left in the hutch, and the four youngest wept with hunger. We gave each of them a small piece, and now they're asleep. But you -- you're going without food to dry the tears of poor innocents too young to understand our poverty. It's enough to make a man tear his hair° in despair!"

There was a moment of silence within the hut, made more solemn by the raging elements outside and the sobs of mother and children. Then the woodcutter spoke.

"You're right, my dear wife, I've failed in my duty. This is the hour of prayer. Let us pray to the good Lord with fervour° and trust, and beg forgiveness for me in this moment of weakness."

This act of Christian piety° was barely done when a knock on the door startled the family. "Come in," said the peasant. The door of the hut opened to admit an aged woman bent double°, walking with the help of a long cane. The family hurried to help her off with a dripping old cape that barely covered her shoulders, then sat her down beside the hearth and threw another fagot on the fire.

"I'm hungry," said the beggar-woman, once she had warmed herself. "Give me some supper, for the love of God."

"We're very poor, my good mother°," replied the peasant. "We've nothing but bread, but I offer you that with all my heart." And so saying, he gave her the little bit of bread that remained in the hutch. While the old woman devoured this meagre fare°, the children gazed at her tearfully.

"I've had nothing to eat for two days," said the old woman, once she had downed the last mouthful. "Another bit of bread for the love of Our Lady! "

"We have no more," said the woodcutter. "But wait, good mother -- I'll run over to my neighbour's house not half a league° from here. He's rich and has plenty of everything. He knows I'm honest and hardworking, and he won't refuse me a loaf of bread."

"He'll be poorer than you tomorrow," said the old woman with assurance. "I've just come from his house, and not only did he refuse me the shelter of his roof this terrible night: he even denied me the paltry scrap of bread one gives to the poor. But hark!"

The raging wind fell silent as if at the behest of some powerful genie, and a bright fire blazed up on the hearth. The beating of wings was heard, as though a huge bird with a twenty-foot wingspan had passed over the forest.

"It's the ministering angel of God's justice," said the old woman solemnly, "going his nocturnal round in the kingdom of Saint Louis°, the friend and father of the poor on earth and in heaven!"

The family was seized with terror at this pronouncement, and all fell face down on the earthen floor. The old woman rose from her seat, opened the door of the hut, and stretched her hand toward the dwelling of the pitiless rich man. "Behold the justice of the Lord passeth over!" she cried. An immense bolt of (p095end-p096begin) lightning lit up the sky and a dreadful clap of thunder shook the forest as torrents of flame heralded the merciless nabob's ruin.

"Have pity! Have pity on him!" cried the woodcutter and his wife.

"The justice of the Almighty is inflexible°," replied the old woman with authority. "This man has always refused the poor the shelter of his roof and the crumbs from his table. The hand of God has struck justly!" The beldam said nothing for a moment, then added, "The hutch from which you took the last bit of bread for the poor beggar-woman will fill up as fast as you can empty it, and when you are rich, you will build a shelter for suffering humanity in place of this hovel." And with these words she disappeared.

Contents of this page

GLOSSARY

* peasants (n)
 -- (used in former times) a person who works on the land,
 especially one who owns and lives on a small piece of land
* thatched (adj) -- with a roof covering made of straw or reeds
* Flood (n)
 -- a flood is the covering with water of a place that is usually dry
 or a great overflow of water; the Flood refers to the story in
 the Bible of Noah and the Ark
* hearth (n)
 -- the area around the fire in one's home, especially the floor of the fireplace
* straw (n)
 -- dried stems of grain plants, such as wheat, used for animals to sleep on
* woodcutter (n)
 -- a person whose job is to cut down trees
* lose heart (exp)
 -- lose courage or firmness of purpose
* Our Lady (n)
 -- a name for Mary, the mother of Jesus [UKT: Mary is aka Virgin Mary]
* sustain (v)
 -- keep strong; strengthen
* tear his hair (exp)
 -- feel hopeless
* fervour (n)
 -- showing strong and warm feelings
* piety (n)
 -- deep respect for God and religion
* bent double (exp)
 -- sloped or leaned away from an upright position
* good mother (exp)
 -- an older woman who is kind and loving
* meagre fare (n)
 -- not enough food, especially for a meal (p096end-p097begin)
* half a league (n)
 -- an old unit of measurement, equal to about two or three kilometres
* assurance (n)
 -- certainty; confidence
* Saint Louis (n)
 -- Louis XI, a king of France who devoted his life to helping the poor
* pronouncement (n)
 -- a solemn declaration or statement
* inflexible (adj) -- cannot be bent or turned away from a purpose

There may be other words and expressions in the story that are not familiar to you. Write each one in your journal. Then look it up in a dictionary, ask another student, or ask the teacher for a definition. Write the definition on the line beside the word or expression. Try to use the new word or expression in a sentence.

Contents of this page

ACTIVITIES

READING ACTIVITY

Guess the Meaning of Words from Context

Match each italicized word in the sentences with one of the meanings in the list below. Sometimes, you will be able to guess the meaning of the word from the sentence (from the context); other times, you will have to read what comes before and after that sentence in the text.

01. The rain fell in torrents for a week. (torrents )
02. A dwindling log burned in the fireplace. (dwindling )
03. The children lay on piles of filthy rags. (filthy )
04. What misery and heartache poor people have to bear! (misery )
05. A knock on the door startled the family. (startled )
06. The old woman was so hungry she devoured the bread. (devoured )
07. The rich man did not give her a paltry scrap of bread. (paltry )
08. The raging wind fell silent as if some genie had power over it. (genie )
09. The angel is going on his nocturnal round. (nocturnal )
10. You will build a shelter for people in place of this hovel. (hovel )

     a) active at night
     b) ate up quickly (p097end-p098begin)
     c) becoming gradually smaller or fewer
     d) caused to jump with sudden surprise
     e) great unhappiness or great pain and suffering
     f) magical spirit in Arab fairy stories
     g) small dirty place to live in
     h) very dirty
     i) violently rushing streams of water
     j) worthless or very small piece (of food)

 

LISTENING ACTIVITY

Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspé

This is a summary of important dates in the life of Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspé. First, listen to the text. Second, listen to the text and fill in the blanks in your journal. Third, listen to the text and complete the blanks. Discuss the answers with the teacher and other students.

1786     
               Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspe was born in Quebec City.

1790s - early 1800s
               __________ __________ __________ __________

_____
               He was the sheriff of Quebec City.

1837
               __________ __________ __________ __________

_____
               He published his first book, Les Aniens canadiens.

1866
               __________ __________ __________ __________

_____
               He died in Quebec City.

 

DISCUSSION AND WRITING ACTIVITIES

Point of View
The story is told from the point of view of the woodcutter. Retell the story, either orallyor in writing, from the point of view of (1) the woodcutter's wife, (2) the two older children, (3) the old woman, or (4) the rich man. (p098end-p099begin)

A Dark and Stormy Night
Create and develop your own story, beginning with the famous first line, "It was a dark and stormy night." Share your story with the teacher and other students. Whose story was the most suspenseful? Why?

Canadian Women of Long Ago
The women listed below helped people in Canada a long time ago. Choose one of them and find out some information about her and the times in which she lived. Then talk or write about your information with other students.
   Jeanne Mance Marie     Marguerite d'Youville
   Marguerite Bourgeoys   Mother Marie-Léonie
   Marie de l'Incamation  Mother Marie-Rose

Canadian Men of Long Ago
The men listed below helped people to settle in Canada a long time ago. Choose one of them and find out some information about him and the times in which he lived. Then talk or write about your information with other students.
 01. François de Laval ,  02. Jean de Brébeuf
 03. Jacques Cartier,  04. Louis Hebert
 05.  Jacques Marquette,  05. Samuel de Champlain

Bread
Brainstorm about the topic of bread. Name different types of bread. Which ones do you like or dislike? Why? Do you buy bread? Where? How much does it cost? Do you make bread? Why? What is your recipe? What is your favourite recipe that contains bread as an ingredient?

Poverty
According to economics, poverty is defined as the inability of people to provide the necessities of life. However, poverty is not simply an economic matter. How much stress and helplessness must people suffer before they are considered poor? Find out some information about poverty in Canada: Who are the poor? What is the poverty line? What are anti-poverty programs and what effect do they have on people? (p099end-p100begin)

 

LIBRARY BOOKS

If you would like to read other works by Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspé, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

Yellow-Wolf and Other Tales of the Saint Lawrence
(Montreal: Vehicule, 1990). A collection of stories and memoirs from which "The Poor Cottage" was taken. This edition was translated by Jane Brierly.

Canadians of Old
(Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1974). A historical novel set in the 18th-century, first published as Les Anciens canadiens in 1863. This edition was translated by Sir Charles G. D. Roberts and first published in 1890.

A Man of Sentiment
(Montreal: Véhicule, 1988). A collection of tales and memories of early 19th-century French Canadian life. First published in French in 1866 as Mémoires. This edition was translated by Jane Brierley.

If you would like to read more about the times Philippe-Joseph Aubert de Gaspé wrote about, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

Folklore of Canada
Edith Fowke (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1982). A collection of folk tales, legends, and other kinds of folklore from all regions of Canada.

New France
Rosemary Livesey (Toronto: Stoddart, 1989). An illustrated look at the people of New France, and how they lived. (p100end)

Contents of this page

12. Water Poetry
-- Hector de St-Oenys Gameau, F. R. Scott and Raymond Souster

(p101begin)

UKT141117:  The painting by John McNiel in the printed book has been substituted by a painting by my wife Daw Than Than of a Canadian scene.

WARM-UP

Look at the picture carefully. What do you see in it? How does it make you think and feel? If you wrote a poem about this picture, what would you write? Why? Many well-known Canadian poets have written poems about water. One of them is Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau.

Listening Activity

This is a text on the life of Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau.
- First, listen to the text.
- Second, listen to the text and write as much of it as you can in your journal. (p101end-p102begin)
- Third, listen to the text and complete it. Discuss it with the teacher and other students.

Introduction to the Poems

There are three poems in this chapter. They are all about water. If you wrote a poem about water, what would you write about: a stream? a river? a pool? a pond? a lake? the sea? the ocean? Why? What do you think these poets wrote about? Listen' to the poems and read them as many times as you wish.

 

Contents of this page

Poems

Poem 1

Ice mothers me
My bed is rock
Over sand I move silently.

I am crystal clear
To a sunbeam°.
No grasses grow in me
My banks° are clean.

Foam runs from the rapid
To rest on my dark pools.

Poem 2

O my eyes this morning, wide as a river
O wave of my eyes swift to reflect all things
And this coolness under my eyelids
A marvel
Circling the images I see

As a stream cools an island
And as the fluent wave curls around
That sun-dappled° girl (p102end-p103begin)

Poem 3

No-one knows the exact moment
of what hour
the first drop of rain will fall.

But after one whole week
of blinding sun
of scorched° grass
of wilting° leaves,
it somehow seems important.

So I watch and wait
along with the birds,
along with the ants,
along with every living
breathing thing,

for that first heavy
cool splash of rain
to wet the page
of this poem about the rain.

 

Contents of this page

GLOSSARY

* sunbeam (n)
 -- a ray or line of natural light from the sun
* banks (n)
 -- the land or shore along the sides of a river or a lake
* sun-dappled (adj)
 -- marked with spots of sun and shadow
* scorched (adj)
 -- burned so as to change a thing's colour, taste, or feeling, but not to destroy it completely
* wilting (adj)
 -- becoming less fresh and starting to die

There may be other words and expressions in the poems that are not familiar to you. Write each one in your journal. Then look it up in a dictionary, ask another student, or ask the teacher for a definition. Write the definition on the line beside the word or expression. Try to use the new word or expression in a sentence. (p103end-p104begin)

Contents of this page

ACTIVITIES

READING ACTIVITIES

Mix and Match
Read the three poems again. In pairs or small groups, decide what title you would give to each poem. Write your choices in your journal and discuss the reasons for them with the teacher and other students.
     Poem 1
     Poem 2
     Poem 3

Read the poems again and match them with the actual titles in your journal. Discuss your choices and the reasons for them with the teacher and other students.
     Poem 1   a) "Waiting for the First Drop"
     Poem 2   b) "North Stream"
     Poem 3   c) "River of My Eyes"

Analyze the Poems
Discuss the answers to these questions with the teacher and other students:
1. Who is the speaker in each poem?
2. What kind of person does he or she seem to be?
3. To whom is he or she speaking?
4. What is the speaker's point of view and relation to the subject?
5. What is the general mood or feeling (tone) of each poem?
6. Is the feeling consistent from poem to poem or is there a shift in tone?
7. What is the situation or occasion of each poem?
8. What is the setting in time and space of each poem?

 

LISTENING ACTIVITY

Interactive Dictation
An interactive dictation is similar to a dictation, such as the one in the warm-up, but the texts are dictated by students to students.
     An interactive dictation is done in pairs. One member of the pair is Student A and the other member is Student B. Student A is the only one who looks at the (p104end-p105begin) text marked Student A, and Student B is the only one who looks at the text marked Student B.
     Student A takes the first turn. Student A dictates a text on the life of E R. Scott to Student B. That is, Student A will read the text first, read the text with pauses a second time, and then read the text a third time.
     Student B takes the second turn. Student B dictates a text on the life of Raymond Souster to Student A. That is, Student B will read the text three times, following the procedure described for Student A.
     In order to correct the interactive dictation, Student A looks at Student B's journal, and Student B looks at Student A's journal. Discuss the corrections with the teacher and other students.


STUDENT A

Read to Student B

Francis Reginald Scott was born in Quebec City in 1899. His father, F. G. Scott, was an Anglican minister and a poet. F. R. Scott studied law at McGill University in Montreal and Oxford University in England. After he returned to Canada, Scott worked as a lawyer and taught at McGill. He also became involved in politics and was one of the leading members of the New Democratic Party. Much of F. R. Scott's poetry deals with social issues. A great many other poems demonstrate his love of Canadian landscapes and water-scapes. E R. Scott died in Montreal in 1985. .

Write in Your Journal

Raymond Souster


STUDENT B

Read to Student A

Raymond Souster was born in 1921 in Toronto. He has lived in Toronto nearly all his life and worked for more than 45 years in a bank there. His first book of poems, When We Were Young, was published in 1946. His most famous book is The Colour of the Times, which won the Governor General's Award for poetry in 1964. Some of Souster's better collections include A Local Pride and As Is. (p105end-p106begin)

 

Write in Your Journal

F. R. Scott

DISCUSSION AND WRITING ACTIVITIES

Match the Poems and the Poets
Read the poems again and match them with the actual authors in your journal. Discuss your choices and the reasons for them with the teacher and other students.
   Poem 1   a) Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau translated by John Glassco
   Poem 2   b) Raymond Souster
   Poem 3   c) F. R. Scott

Evaluate the Poets
Talk or write about your evaluation of each poet. Do you like each poet's work? If so, why ? If not, why not? How does the work of these poets compare to the work of your own favourite poets?

Identify "Poetic License"
"Poetic license" allows poetry to depart from the standard rules of logic and grammar. If you are not sure what "poetic license" is, discuss it with the teacher and other students. Then talk or write about the "poetic license" in the poems above. Give other examples of "poetic license" from the poetry you have read.

Describe the Symbols and Images
Talk or write about the symbols, images, and figures of speech in the poems above. Compare and contrast the symbols, images, and figures of speech in at least two of the poems. Give other examples of symbols, images, and figures of speech from the poetry you have read.

Describe the Rhyme and Metre
Talk or write about the rhyme and metre in the poems above. Compare and contrast the rhyme and metre in at least two of the poems. Give other examples of rhyme and metre from the poetry you have read.
(p106end-p107begin)

Evaluate the Poems
Talk or write about your evaluation of each poem. What is your reaction to each poem ? Do you like each poem ? If so, why ? If not, why not ? How do the poems cornpare to your own favourite poems ?

 

LIBRARY BOOKS

If you would like to read other poems by Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau, F. R. Scott, and Raymond Souster, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

The Complete Poems of Saint-Denys Garneau
(Ottawa: Oberon, 1975). Garneau's collected poems, first published in French in 1949 as Poésies complètes. This translation is by John Glassco.

The Collected Poems of F. R. Scott
(Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1981 ). The winner of the 1981 Governor General's Award for poetry. This book contains French Canadian poems translated by Scott, including some by Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau.

The Colour of the Times
(Toronto: Ryerson, 1964). A collection of Souster's poems up to 1964. Winner of the Governor General's Award for poetry.

Jubilee of Death
(Ottawa: Oberon, 1984). Poems by Souster concerning the Dieppe Raid in World War II, a disastrous military campaign in which 907 Canadian soldiers died.

If you would like to read more about the lives and works of Hector de Saint- Denys Gameau, F. R. Scott, and Raymond Souster, look for the following books in the class, school, or local library, or in a bookstore.

The Journal of Saint-Denys Garneau
(Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1962). A journal kept by the poet between 1935 and 1939, first published in French in 1954 as Journal. This translation is by John Glassco. (p107end-p108begin)

The Politics of the Imagination
Sandra Djwa (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 1987). The major biography of F. R. Scott.

Raymond Souster and His Works
Bruce Whiteman (Toronto: ECW, 1984) A brief book of biography and criticism. (p108end)

Contents of this page

UKT notes

Paul Yee

-- UKT 141125

There are many facts about Canada and the United States which I would to clarify: 
Canada is not a part of the United States.
 - The Canadians fought off the Americans during the War of 1812-1814.
The capital of the United States was invaded during the War of 1812-1814.
 - The American President had no time to eat his dinner. He fled, and the raiders ate his dinner, drank his wine, and burnt down his house. The Americans came back after they had left to white wash it, and from that day onwards it is called the White House.
Canada welcomes new immigrants.
 - The first generation immigrants had to struggle mainly because of their lack of language skill of either English or French - the two official languages. However, many second generation new Canadians have become well adapted. Such as the case of Paul Yee.

From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Yee 141125

Paul Yee (born 1 October 1956)   is a Chinese-Canadian historian and writer.[1] [2] [UKT ¶]

UKT 141125: Paul Yee is a year older than my son Zin Tun, a physicist with Ph.D. from Univ. of McMaster.

Paul Yee is the author of many books for children, including Teach Me to Fly, Skyfighter, The Curses of Third Uncle, Dead Man's Gold, and Ghost Train — winner of the 1996 Governor General's Award for English language children's literature.[3] In 2012, the Writers' Trust of Canada awarded Paul Yee the Vicky Metcalf Award for Literature for Young People in recognition of having "contributed uniquely and powerfully to our literary landscape over a writing career that spans almost 30 years".[4]

From Wikipedia: http://library.ryerson.ca/asianheritage/authors/yee 141125     

Paul Yee is best known as a writer for children and young adults, but he has also written short stories and non-fiction for an adult audience. A native of Spalding, Saskatchewan, Yee grew up in Vancouver’s Chinatown. He received a bachelor’s degree and an M.A. in Canadian history from the University of British Columbia. His thesis is entitled: Chinese business in Vancouver, 1886-1914. He worked as an archivist with the City of Vancouver and then the Archives of Ontario before moving into the area of immigration policy with the government of Ontario. Toronto has been his home since 1988. In 2012, Yee was the recipient of the Vicky Metcalf Award for Children’s Literature that recognizes a body of work.

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