Update: 2018-09-20 04:17 AM -0400

TIL

Approximant Aksharas

Approx.htm   

by U Kyaw Tun (UKT) (M.S., I.P.S.T., USA), Daw Khin Wutyi, Daw Thuzar Myint, Daw Zinthiri Han and staff of Tun Institute of Learning (TIL). Not for sale. No copyright. Free for everyone. Prepared for students and staff of TIL  Research Station, Yangon, MYANMAR 
 - http://www.tuninst.net , www.romabama.blogspot.com

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BEPS-indx.htm

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Introduction
  English speakers and the Laterals

 

 

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Introduction

UKT 180919
By Approximants, I mean rows r6 and r7 of the Myanmar akshara matrix. They are all consonants: even the English y /j/ which is generally known as the Semivowel aka Semi-consonant, is considered to be a basic consonant of BEPS. The IPA classifies the BEPS approximants made up of Fricatives including Lateral Fricatives, and Approximants including Lateral Approximants. I opine that IPA should re-classify the whole group simply as Fricatives and Laterals. Sad to say the Westerners who develop the IPA have little understanding of the Laterals which are very important to Myanmar consonants. For example, English speakers could not understand the Welsh Laterals ending up spelling them with double-L's. See Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lateral_consonant 180919

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English speakers and the Laterals

The language of Angles and Saxons collectively known as Anglo-Saxons was not originally a native of the British Isles. It was the language of the pirates from the North or Norseman who came to plunder the rich country from the ancient Bretons - the original natives carried the booty to their climatically rather bleak countries. They finally decided to settle mainly on the fertile Thames basin, and drove the Bretons out into the mountainous area called Wales, and called the militarily defeated peoples Welsh 'foreigners'. They were successful robbing the Bretons of everything, except their Laterals.

See: A Grammar of Modern Breton by Ian Press, 1947
- https://books.google.com.mm/books?id=SQYPenZO6SUC&pg=PA34&lpg=PA34&dq=Bretons+and+laterals&source=bl&ots=Reqpl2X_UO&sig=e-P4ies8Sbr-D6OsnpOUfW00mKM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi-tevImcjdAhWJiLwKHRINCXkQ6AEwAXoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=Bretons%20and%20laterals&f=false 180919

On p34: Phonology: The laterals and vibrants 
"We see that /ll/, /l/ function as /nn/, /n/ (to the extent too that their definite/indefinite article forms are al/ul. After an unstressed vowel there is some blurring of the difference. The blurring is more or less total in the case of /rr/, /r/; fortis /rr/ is minimally fortis. The situation with nasals, laterals and vibrants(s) is created by the absence of any significant correlation of voice. See Falc'hun in 1951, pp.51, 61)"

 

 

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