Update: 2021-05-20 06:41 PM -0400

TIL

Myanmar Aksharas in Romabama

AK-indx.htm

by U Kyaw Tun (UKT) and staff of TIL (Tun Institute of Learning, http://www.tuninst.net ).

UKT 210311: Because of the need to present Bur-Myan aksharas in my work, before the internet fonts became available, I've to present the aksharas in little pic in pix-format. Even now because my work involves many languages, particularly of 2-way transcription between Bur-Myan and  English in Latin script I still need my own aksharas,

index.htm | Top
BNK-indx.htm

Contents of this page

Basic aks for Bur-Myan - AK1b.htm 
  Linked to only one folder : AK/BNK1b folder in 3x3 array
  - {ka.} ---- {ki.}   {ku.} ------ represent the cardinal vowels  
  -  {k.} --- {k.}  {kn.} ---- represent the mid vowels
  - {kau.}  {ko.}  {kon.} -- represent the monophthongal digraphs
Basic aks and medials for Indo-European languages - AK1bmIE.htm

UKT 210421: Vowels have been studied without the aid of instruments for thousands of years in the East. They had to rely only on their hearing and on the sense of touch on the Adam-apple area until recently. In modern times with advancement in acoustics, the vowels can be studied with based on the sound-waves from which we get formant values, F1 and F2. See the Tongue positions given on the right. You'll notice that the open-vowel /a/ has the maximum F1 value, and the most allowable F2, whilst the close-vowel /u/ has both minimum F1 and F2. This is represented as the /a/ and /u/ being most opposite. Based on this observation, I opine that the English letter "double-U" and "U" are the same: "double-U" is the consonant form, whilst "U" is the vowel form. It explains similar properties between the medial Wa'hsw {qua.}/{kwa.} and Chaung'gnn {ku.}.
Compare BNK1b.htm , BNK1bmIE.htm , and BNK1m1WH.htm

One-former Medials
  - Yapin / Raric comparison / - AK1m1YR.htm 
    e.g. {kya.}; {kra.}
  - Wahsw / Hahto comparison / - AK1m1WH.htm 
    e.g. {qua.}/{kwa.} ; {gnha.}
  - Lahsw - AK1m1L.htm
    e.g. {cla.}/{kla.}

Two-former Medials
  - Rapin.wahsw / Raric.wahsw comparison ./ .  - AK1m2YW-RW.htm
    e.g. {kywa.} ; {krwa.}
  - Yapin.hahto / Raric.hahto . .  - AK1m2YH-RH.htm
    e.g. {mhya.} [myha1] ; {mhra.} [mrhr1]
  - - AK1m2WH.htm
    e.g. {mhwa.} [mhwa1]

Three-former Medials,
   - Yapin.wahsw.hahto .. - AK1m3YWH.htm
   - Raric.wahsw.hato .. - AK1m3RWH.htm

Contents of this page

Scope ol Romabama

The four BEPS languages - Burmese (in Myanmar script), English (in Latin script), Pali (in Myanmar script), and, Sanskrit (in Devanagari script) - comprise the main scope of Romabama. These 4 languages belong either to Tibeto-Burman (Tib-Bur) language group or to the Indo-European  (IE) language group. Most of the other indigenous languages of Myanmarpre belong to Tib-Bur and other language-groups. Though not important, by speaker-count, Mon-Myan was important at one time, but still important for Theravada religious examinations: a Mon monk can still learn Pali texts in Mon-Myan language.

Because of historical reasons, English (Eng-Lat in General American dialect) has now become important, and Romabama has to accept Lisping Consonants. Though most in Myanmarpre think that Pali, to the exclusion of Sanskrit, is important, it is not so. Most of the literature in Traditional Medicine and Astrology have Sanskrit words which are derived form Skt-Dev.

Because of all these reasons, I've to devise many new Aksharas, which you can either accept or reject. They are important because IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), and IAST (International Alphabet for Sanskrit Transliteration) fail to adequately convey the Burmese-Myan phonology used by Romabama.

UKT notes :
Doggie's Tale : copy and paste
Number, punctuation, and stand-in
Segmental fill-ins
Vowels and Vowel-extensions

 

Contents of this page

UKT notes

Doggie's Tale

-- UKT 130613

Mnemonic The Doggie Tale:  
Little doggie cringe in fear -- ŋ (velar),
  Seeing Ella's flapping ears -- ɲ (palatal)
  And, the Shepard's hanging rear -- ɳ (retroflex).
Doggie so sad he can't get it out
  What's that Kasha क्ष when there's a Kha ख ?
  And when there's Jana ज्ञ what I am to do with Jha झ?
On top of all there're husher and hisser, Sha श /ʃ/ and Ssa ष /s/,
  when I am stuck with Theta स /θ/ !" 
Little Doggie don't be sad,
  You are no worse than a Celtic Gnome
  Losing G in his name, he is just a Nome!

Note to digitizer: you can copy and paste the following:
Ā ā ă ấ  Ē ē ĕ ế  Ī ī ĭ  Ō ō ŏ  Ū ū ŭ ː
Ḍ ḍ Ḥ ḥ Ḷ ḷ Ḹ ḹ Ṁ ṁ Ṃ ṃ
Ṅ ṅ Ṇ ṇ ɴ Ṛ ṛ Ṝ ṝ Ś ś Ṣ ṣ Ṭ ṭ ɕ ʂ
Book marks: * star, dagger (alt0134), double dagger (alt0135).
Bur-Myan: for {gna.}-onset use c ċ (U010B) - unfortunately ċ is non-ASCII
Instead of Skt-Dev ः {wic~sa.} use "colon" :
Avagraha ऽ use apostrophe
Repha spelling: exemplified by
  dharma: ध र ् म --> धर्म 
  spota: ष ् प र ् श ा ः --> ष्पर
Root sign √ ; approx ≅
IAST Dev: भ आ इ ई उ ऊ
  ऋ ऌ ऍ ऎ ए ऐ ऑ ऒ ओ औ
  च ca छ cha  श ś [ɕ] /ʃ/ ; ष ṣ [ʂ] /s/; स s [s] /θ/ ; ऋ {iRi.} & ॠ {iRi},
  viram ् , rhotic ऋ ृ
Skt-Dev Row #3: ट ठ ड ढ ण ; conjunct ट ् ठ = ट्ठ
IAST Dev: Repha & Viram-position, e.g. तर्ज tarj [ targ ] = त र ् ज
Skt-Dev special phonemes: Ksa क ् ष = क्ष
Undertie in Dev transcription: ‿ U203F
Using ZWNJ (ZeroWidthNonJoiner), e.g. , क्‌ष (code: क्‌ष)
  See Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-width_non-joiner 150630
IPA-, Pali- & Sanskrit nasals: ŋ ṅ ṅ ,  ɲ , ɳ ṇ ṇ, n n n , m m m
  Pali- & Skt {::tn}: aṁ , aṃ 
IPA symbols:
 ɑ ɒ ə ɛ ɪ ɯ ʌ ʊ ʃ ʧ ʤ θ ŋ ɲ ɳ ɴ ɔ ɹ ʔ /ʰ/ /ʳ/ /ː/
  <king> /kɪŋ/ (DJPD16-300) 
  <kick> /kɪc/ (DJPD16-299 gives /kik/) and <kiss> /kɪs/ (DJPD16-301)
  <church> /ʧɜːʧ/ (DJPD16-097)
  <success> /sək'ses/ (DJPD16-515)
  <thin> /θɪn/ (DJPD16-535), <thorn> /θɔːn/ (DJPD16-535)
  circumflex-acute :
  ấ U+1EA5 , ế U+1EBF
  upsilon-vrachy  ῠ 
  small-u-breve  ῠ ŭ
Subscripts: ₀ ₁ ₂ ₃ ₄ : CO₂
Special brackets: 〈...〉 U+2329. U+122A

Go back Dog-tale-note-b

Contents of this page

Note to TIL editor 210422: TIL preferred font is Arial Unicode MS.
However starting from this line, the following is in Default font.

Number, punctuation, and stand-in

- , , , , , , , ,
- [poad1],  [poad2] : ordinarily you can use /,  //,  and comma, but not semi-colon and colon
- {On}, , ,

 

Segmental fill-ins

Before we go into "Vowels and Vowel-extensions" below, below are some illustrative examples with {ka.} akshara. This list is linked to BNK1-fill-sg and BNK1vow-ex  folders:

Simple vowels
- [aa1-sg] to be filled in with {ka.} --> {ka.}
- [aa1-sg] + {ka.} + [-a2] --> {ka}

Split vowels: they are filled in in 2 steps
- [au1-weik-sg] --(split)--> +
- [e-] + {ka.} -->   
+ [-a1] --> {kau.}

 

Contents of this page

Vowels and Vowel-extensions

- UKT 210427

Abugidic-consonants  contain an inherent vowel {a.} // which in effect make them vowels. Because of this property when I sculpt individual glyphs, I can legitimately attach the following vowel-extensions to the aksharas. The following is a list of vowel-extensions.

One way to reduce the number of Aksharas in Akshara banks is to couple with extenders given below as "right-hand part" and "left-hand part:

Right-hand part :

- [-a1], [-a2], [-a3],  [-a2f], [-u1], [-u2],  [-u3],  [-dot2], [-dot-mid], [-dot-sub], 
- [-eiy1], [-eiy2], [-ar2], [-al2], [-aO2], [-ish2], [-iSS2], [-ath2], [-ah2]
- [-ng1],  [-ng2], [-ng3], [-iny1], [-iny2], [-iny3], [-aeNNYY1], [-aeNNYY2],  [-aeNNYY3],
- [-uNN1], [-uNN2], [-un1], [-un2], [-un3], [-um1], [-um2], [-um3]
- [-ak], [-ic], [-uT], [-ut], [-up]
- [-ak-ka1], [-ak-ka1], [-ic-sa1], [-ic-sa1], [-uTT-TTa1], [-TT-TTa1], [-ut-ta1], [-ut-ta1], [-up-pa1], [-up-pa1], [-um-ma1]

 

Left-hand part and Numbers :

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, ,
, ,
, , , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , ,
, , , , , , ,

, ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , ,
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

, , , ,

, ,

, , , , , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

,

, , ,

, , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, ,

, , , ,

,

, ,

, , , , , , ,
,

, , , , , ,  
, , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , ,
, , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,

, , , , , , , , ,
, , ,

, , , , , , , , , ,
, , , , , , ,
 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
,
, , ,
, , , , , ,

,

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
, , ,

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

,

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

, , , , , ,

 

 

Some examples: 
- stops: {kak}, {moaK}
- approximants: {k}, {ky}, {kr}, {kl}, {kw}
- semi-nasals: {kn.} , {kn} , {kn:}, 
- true-nasals: {kum.}, {kum}, {kum:}
- disyllabic stops:  {tak~ka.}, 

 

Contents of this page

End of TIL file